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Explorer Research Project

Explorer Research Project
Lauren

A few weeks ago I was assigned an Explorer, Ferdinand Magellan. I had to create a powerpoint presentation on google slides and share my results with a small group of my classmates. Lately, we have been learning about the Age of Exploration. Today, I will be sharing what I learned from my research and my reflection of this topic.

New Knowledge
After this assignment, I have acquired some new knowledge on Ferdinand Magellan. He was a Portuguese explorer who was born in Sabrosa in 1480. Ferdinand sailed for both Spain and Portugal during his navigation career. Magellan was the first to circumnavigate the world in 1519, which was funded by Charles V of Spain. Ferdinand Magellan also discovered the strait that connected the Atlantic to the Pacific. (AKA the "Strait of Magellan") He also acquired new knowledge of land and sciences. He died in the Mactan Battle in 1521.

Reflection
I really enjoyed giving and watching these presentations. I think that…

Analysis on Experiment

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Analysis on Experiment Lauren Kennedy, Emilie Mutoniwabo, Jamie Lanzen, Rebecca Baril Our experiment was testing out how different types of vinegar mixed with baking soda can change the distance a plastic water bottle travels when baking soda and vinegar are mixed in the water bottle. Our hypothesis was that the apple cider vinegar was going to make the rocket move the farthest, because it had the most acids, such as acetic acids and amino acids. During our experiment, we found out that neither of the types of vinegar made the water bottle move at all. All it did was foam out of the bottle, but it didn’t move.
If we do this experiment again, a couple things we might do are get a lighter water bottle or add in more vinegar and baking soda to result in more of a chemical reaction. This image shows our bar graph used to represent our data. Google Document

Matter

I watched a couple of brainpop videos about matter. I decided to share my newly refreshed knowledge.
Summary of Knowledge: (Measuring Matter)

Mass, Volume and Density are all physical properties of matter that are used to measure matter. Matter is anything that has mass, and volume. We measure matter to identify unknown substances, compare substances, and standardize those measurements. To find the mass of an object, measure the object on a digital scale, or a triple beam balance. This method is successful because on milliliter is equivalent to 1 cubic centimeter. To find the volume of an object, multiply it's dimensions, (length x width x height) or displace that object in water. Density is the measure of how tightly packed the atoms are inside of it. To find the density of an object, divide mass/volume.

Summary of Knowledge:
(States of Matter)
Matter is anything that has mass and volume. Matter is made up of atoms. Atoms can chemically combine with other atoms and form a new …

Lesson 6: Five Number Summary

Welcome to the sixth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson we will be learning how to find the five number summary.

Lesson 6: Five Number Summary

What is a Five Number summary? A summary of all the main points within a data set, splitting it into four sections each with a value of 25%

Here is an example of a data set.
68, 73, 78, 80, 83, 85 , 86, 90, 96

The first part of the five number summary is the minimum, the number with the least value (68)

The second part of the five number summary is the maximum, the number with the greatest value (96)

The third part of the five number summary is the median, the number in the middle (83)

The fourth part of the five number summary is the lower quartile, the median of the lower half (75.5)

The fifth part of the five number summary is the upper quartile, the median of the upper half (88)

Lesson 5: MAD

Welcome to the fifth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson, we will be learning about calculating MAD.

Lesson 5: MAD

What is MAD? MAD is the summary of how much the values in a data set vary or clutter.
This is an example of a data set.
10,11,11,12,13,15

To find the MAD of a data set, we first have to find the mean of all the numbers.
10+11+11+12+13+15= 72
72/6 = 12

Next, we have to find the absolute value of the mean (12) and each of the numbers in the data set.
l10-12l = 2
l11-12l =1
l11-12l =1
l12-12l =0
l13-12l =1
l15-12l =3

Then, we have to find the mean of these new numbers.
2+1+1+0+1+3= 8
8/6= 1.3333333..

So, 1,333333.. is the MAD of the data set.

Lesson 4: Histograms

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Welcome to the fourth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson, we will be learning about histograms.

Lesson 4: Histograms

What is a Histogram? A histogram is a diagram consisting of rectangles whose area is equal to the amount of a variable and its width is equal to the interval.

This is an example of a Histogram.

Now let's answer some questions!

How many hours were studied? 5+4+3= 12

Which interval does the median fall? 4-5

How many hours were studied for students 4-5 and over? 4+3= 7



Lesson 3: Unknown Values (Mean)

Welcome to the third part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson we will be learning about unknown values. (mean)

Lesson 3: Unknown Values (Mean)
What is an unknown value in a mean question? A question that asks for the unknown value in a data set.
This is an example of an unknown value mean question: Katie buys 6 hair ties. These are the costs of the hair ties: 16,19,22,30.50,41.50,___The mean price is 25.50. What is the cost of the 6th hair tie?
There are two ways to solve this problem: Trial and Error: Add up all of the known values. Divide by the number of units (in this case, hair ties). Trial and Error the unknown value until you reach the correct mean. Check your work. 16+19+22+30.50+41.50= 129 Unknown value: 24
Checking:
16+19+22+30.50+41.50+24= 153
153/6= 25.50

Backwards: Add up all of the known values. Multiply the number of units (in this case, hair ties) by the mean. Subtract the known values from the product of the units and mean. Check your work. Example: 16+19+22+3…