Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Matter

 I watched a couple of brainpop videos about matter. I decided to share my newly refreshed knowledge.

Summary of Knowledge:
(Measuring Matter)

Mass, Volume and Density are all physical properties of matter that are used to measure matter. Matter is anything that has mass, and volume. We measure matter to identify unknown substances, compare substances, and standardize those measurements. To find the mass of an object, measure the object on a digital scale, or a triple beam balance. This method is successful because on milliliter is equivalent to 1 cubic centimeter. To find the volume of an object, multiply it's dimensions, (length x width x height) or displace that object in water. Density is the measure of how tightly packed the atoms are inside of it. To find the density of an object, divide mass/volume.

Summary of Knowledge:
(States of Matter)
Matter is anything that has mass and volume. Matter is made up of atoms. Atoms can chemically combine with other atoms and form a new molecule, or substance. A substance made up of only one type of atom is called an element. The periodic table of elements lists all the known elements that chemically combine with other types of elements to form everything else! Solids, liquids, and gases are all made up of atoms. Liquids have a fixed volume, but not a fixed shape. The atoms inside of a liquid vibrate and slide past one another. If you increase the temperature of a liquid, and reach it's boiling point, it will become a gas. But no matter how many times that substance changes states, the chemical composition stays the same. Water is made up of H20. If you boil liquid water, it becomes steam. But that steam is still made up of H2O. Gases don't have a fixed volume, or a fixed shape. The atoms inside of a gas are very spread apart, and they move around unexpectedly. If you freeze liquid water, it becomes solid ice. Ice has a fixed volume, and a fixed shape. Atoms inside of a solid are packed tightly together and vibrate in place. Other than solids, liquids, and gases there are a couple of other states of matter. Plasma is an electrically charged gas. Colloids are mixtures that contain two separate phases of matter. Bose-Einstein condensate is a state that can only be created in a lab because the temperature is close to absolute zero.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Lesson 6: Five Number Summary

Welcome to the sixth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson we will be learning how to find the five number summary.

Lesson 6: Five Number Summary

What is a Five Number summary? A summary of all the main points within a data set, splitting it into four sections each with a value of 25%

Here is an example of a data set.
68, 73, 78, 80, 83, 85 , 86, 90, 96

The first part of the five number summary is the minimum, the number with the least value (68)

The second part of the five number summary is the maximum, the number with the greatest value (96)

The third part of the five number summary is the median, the number in the middle (83)

The fourth part of the five number summary is the lower quartile, the median of the lower half (75.5)

The fifth part of the five number summary is the upper quartile, the median of the upper half (88)

Lesson 5: MAD

Welcome to the fifth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson, we will be learning about calculating MAD.

Lesson 5: MAD

What is MAD? MAD is the summary of how much the values in a data set vary or clutter.
This is an example of a data set.
10,11,11,12,13,15

To find the MAD of a data set, we first have to find the mean of all the numbers.
10+11+11+12+13+15= 72
72/6 = 12

Next, we have to find the absolute value of the mean (12) and each of the numbers in the data set.
l10-12l = 2
l11-12l =1
l11-12l =1
l12-12l =0
l13-12l =1
l15-12l =3

Then, we have to find the mean of these new numbers.
2+1+1+0+1+3= 8
8/6= 1.3333333..

So, 1,333333.. is the MAD of the data set.

Lesson 4: Histograms

Welcome to the fourth part of the Data Analysis Series! In this lesson, we will be learning about histograms.

Lesson 4: Histograms

What is a Histogram? A histogram is a diagram consisting of rectangles whose area is equal to the amount of a variable and its width is equal to the interval.

This is an example of a Histogram.

Now let's answer some questions!

How many hours were studied? 5+4+3= 12

Which interval does the median fall? 4-5

How many hours were studied for students 4-5 and over? 4+3= 7